How to 'anti-rust' steel rims?

Discussion in 'HOW TO' started by gcrank1, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    So, Im cleaning up my old 'spaceliner' (Murry 'M.O.' stamped) steel rims (complete wheels); I have to wire brush the inevitable rusty spots on the tube liner side and am thinking that some kid of paint might be a good idea in there.
    What do you guys recommend ? Id like it to be good for another 40+ years.
    BTW, the SOS pads did a great job in the outside surfaces.
     
  2. Joe_Knesek

    Joe_Knesek

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Lyndhurst, Ohio
  3. Harvie

    Harvie

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    In my house
    CLR works great at removing rust....in local Homedepot or Lowes then spray Locktite rust killer on them to seal it is called Extend
     
  4. B607

    B607 Pro Member

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,008
    Location:
    Findlay, IL
    Brush off the loose rust and paint with a product called Extend. It looks like milk and turns the rust black and becomes a sort of primer, neutralizing the rust. It doesn't react to painted surfaces, only rust. Spray a coat of your usual paint right on top of the extend. It's about $8 a bottle at your local hardware store. This product would not be good on outside parts that are showing, but perfect for the inside of your rims. Gary
     
  5. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    I wonder if that 'Rust Free' product is similar to the household rust and stain removers? I have some of those but never thought of trying them on a project like this. I have used the Extend, wayyyy back when they first came out with it and I was in the motorcycle shop, I had one bare steel part, exposed to the weather, that I treated with it. It only needed an occasional oil wipedown to stay basically 'live rust' free. All in all, I was satisfied with it.
    Im glad I didnt get in a hurry and just wire brush the rims out and spray with whatever paint I had left over (fools rush in where Angels fear to tread....). These are good suggestions and worth considering.
     
  6. deorman

    deorman

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    8,510
    Location:
    Fairfax, VA
  7. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    After a little 'net search' Ive discovered that most (all?) of these type products, regardless of brand, work in an acid environment (thus the 'whichever' acid listed to accelerate) and use tannic acids of varying strengths to convert the rust to 'blacked' surface, which through the chemical process is no longer active oxidation. Those which are mostly acid strip away the rust, but dont 'convert' as well as those with a higher tannic level. In particular, Rustoleum Rust Reformer (avail. at my local Wal store, reasonably priced) seems to be a good balance and has been well regarded, even for some historical artifact preservation.
    I think Im going to go for the wire brush and flush, dry, then two coats of it before a paint coat; unless anyone here has any good reason not to.
     
  8. Dr. Tankenstein

    Dr. Tankenstein

    Rating - 100%
    9   0   0

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    4,153
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    Just an FYI...

    The Rustoleum Rust Reformer goes on flat black/dark grey in color.

    PM me if you'd like to discuss using tannic acid to 'stain' your rims. Never tried it on a bike, but I've got some experience making oak leaf stain.

    Cheers,
    Dr. T
     
  9. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    I know what you mean, Doc........oldtimers used black walnut die, heavy in tannins, to boil their traps, and I never had thought about it for other iron based metals in my mechanical world, but should have got outside my box. I could see using this as a cheap 'blacking' for exterior rat parts that could then be periodically wiped down with an oily rag for maintenance.
    My rusty spots inside the rim, where the moisture gets trapped by rimtape (maybe thats partly why they used to use cloth rimtape?) and tubes/tires will be fine with just the treatment, though I dont see a downside to an oilbased paint in there. Im pretty sure that whatever I do will outlast me.
    As I see it, about the worst thing is having a bike left outside, then the tires go flat and moisture can get inside and sit to rust. That sure wont happen here!
     

Share This Page