Where to post, mountain bikes, fat bikes or builds?

Discussion in 'KLUNKERS & MOUNTAIN BIKES' started by us56456712, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. us56456712

    us56456712

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,253
    Location:
    The middle of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan
    It's finished. $1300.00. I have more into it as I bought an extra set of tires, a gooseneck that was too long, an extra bash guard and three seats before I found a comfortable one. The bike weighs 20 pounds. I took it on a moderately rough seven mile single track ride and it is unbelievable. It accelerates like crazy, is very responsive in tight stuff, you have to do very little shifting because of the weight and I was able to climb a long steep hill that I never cleared before. Only three of us in our group cleared it. The wide tires kept me from slipping on the hill and one orher who climbed it rode a fat bike. All the second and third parts buying was worth it as the bike is a perfect fit. I have never ridden carbon before so I thought I might not like it as I like the flex feel of steel frames. Carbon is now my favorite.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
    RustyGold and horsefarmer like this.
  2. horsefarmer

    horsefarmer

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    2,991
    Location:
    Peshtigo Wisconsin
    Glad it works for you! I'm sure you enjoy being back in the saddle.
     
    us56456712 likes this.
  3. us56456712

    us56456712

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,253
    Location:
    The middle of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan
    I rode the 50K in Hiawatha's Revenge today on this 20 pound bike. Last year I rode the 100K in this event on my much heavier build off single speed gravel klunker based on a 1951 Columbia repop. I almost didn't finish the 50K and had a hard time keeping up with the slow riders. I'm wondering if I will ever recover from my back fusion to the point where I can keep up. As one of the other riders pointed out, you may be slow but you are lapping the couch potatoes.
     
    hammer mechanic and RustyGold like this.
  4. us56456712

    us56456712

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,253
    Location:
    The middle of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan
    This is an old post but needs an update. This past weekend I rode this bike in the Marji Gesick and finished the 63 mile 10,000 feet of climb bike race in just over 17 hours. This is the hardest single day bike race in the USA and the inexpensive Chinese frame and all the other carbon components held up. This is billed as the short 50 mile version of the 100 mile Marji classic but both are way over distance and it gets longer each year. They make it harder every year. The trail gets harder the further you go so the last 50 that I did is the hardest part. I have ridden most of the trails in 10 - 15 mile segments before but was not ready for how brutal it is. I kept riding the bike harder and harder before the race to see if it was up to this and it didn't break so I used it. I'm still not sure I would recommend it for someone over 160 pounds. It had three packs, two lights, two water bottles on it and I had on a chest and back pack. It is self supported so you have to bring all your food and drink. I had two drop bags and my daughter and one of her friends as support crew and beautiful cheer leaders. It pored so hard you couldn't see the trail for the last 15 miles and this is the toughest part with endless 5 to 10 foot rock drops, boulders and roots. I couldn't ride any of this in the slippery clay so I strided to keep upright, pushed and lowered my bike down the drops. This part took me almost 7 hours and I fell so many times that I quit counting after 8. I slid down a polished glacial rock face that I was trying to climb and couldn't stop until the bottom. It was like winter sledding. A lot of people quit here after sliding down. There were still miles to go at this point. To be fair I don't know if the bike would have splintered on this last part had it been dry and I rode it. This part with the drops was just built just for the race so I had never ridden it. The layout flags were still there. These trails are all hand built, no machines so they don't flow, are rough as no obstacles have been removed, and are narrow and twist around tight trees. I did fly down a 3 story concrete stairway in an abandoned mine site and almost crashed into the woods at the bottom. I did a brakie to avoid hitting trees and jammed my thumb on the shifters. That was the longest high speed bumpy spot I took. The other drops were done very cautiously and slow as you could go safely. I'm still not sure if this bike is up to an animal rider, but for me it was good. I put on a dropper seat and heavier 26 inch 3 and 2.8 inch wide tires on it. The saddle was a Selle San Marco GND-e Full Fit Racing titanium job and is the most comfortable seat I have ever ridden on, better than a Brooks even for me. I had no problems with a sore back side. Right now I am bruised, cuts on both legs and head, developed a bad cold, and have 8 stitches in my back. I still feel bad and spend most of my time sleeping. I'll never do this again. In fact I'm wondering if I can ever stand the site of a bicycle let alone ride one ever again. I need a new hobby, knitting sounds good. Anyway, the inexpensive Chinese carbon parts took this abuse, perhaps I was just lucky.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2019
    RustyGold and MattiThundrrr like this.
  5. Klunkruiser

    Klunkruiser

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2019
    Messages:
    560
    I'd suggest sewing. I'm fixin to take it up in hope that I can make some lightweight flexy hammock-like banana seats out of a snowboard(which might have some carbon fiber in there somewhere).
    Might have to get one of them fancy wood handled butter knifes.

    Something similar to your bike build is what I'd like to aspire to in the future.
    I've only recently gotten back into riding after a near four decade hiatus. There was a Proflex 856 that I bought used about 20 years ago, but never loved the bike and never really rode it a lot. There was a lot of moving parts on that bike. And I don't think it really fit me all that well, as I bought it from a guy who was around five inches shorter than me.

    I raced a little motocross and cross country on a motorcycle in my late teens and early 20's, but never rode or raced in any sanctioned bicycle event.

    The endurance type riding sounds like something I'd like to attempt. Not really racing against a bunch of more experienced riders. Just trying to find the will to finish in one piece.
    I don't know if I could get myself in condition to complete such a race. But I'd like to try.

    Right now I'm still feeling my way around bike building. Have collected a bunch of parts bikes and have kind of figured out which frames fit me and what I will be looking for when I go to build something higher end like you have done. And have started to realize that I like lightweight fast bikes that are easy to carry when I have to.
    So I've spent about 800 or so figuring all this out between my 15 or so parts bikes, a new seat, six new tires, a couple of cheap BMX bars, and a chrome fork.
    Once I get all these situated and unload about two thirds of them, I'd like to take on the task of either building or buying a higher end lightweight bike with a bunch of gears.

    Thanks for sharing your experiences.
     
  6. us56456712

    us56456712

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,253
    Location:
    The middle of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan
    Like you I quit biking in about 1990 and started up again about 7 years ago. I had never mountain biked before. I also raced a little motocross and enduro in 1966 - 67 - 69 and that helps because body position is similar for motorized and pedal power. I had a problem getting it in my head that the rear brakes is on the right. I rode Europe a few years ago on a rented bike and they have the front brake on the right hand. Some motorcyclists have their mountain bike cables reversed. What I did is research frame geometry, decided on the frame size, and bought slightly outdated technology because it was cheaper. I bought new in the wrappers Velocity Blunt 26+ wheels for less then the hoops cost. They were old but the hubs were new enough that they could be converted to through axle. 26 inch is lighter but tire selection is limited. I bought a SCRAM full carbon crank with 3 x chainrings and converted it to a 2 x and used the last chainring area to mount a bash guard. I didn't go with the super wide handle bars but something in-between because that is lighter. The rigid fork on my frame isn't slack but more upright so it steers better than the new jobs at a slow rate so I didn't need wide bars. Once you decide what you want spend the whole winter on eBay and only buy good deals that are new. Chinese carbon frames and forks had a price drop after Christmas before the new models came out.

    This bike accelerates like mad, climbs well and steers like a dream but for real rough stuff (like the race I just did) it is not as easy to ride as my full suspension jobs. Still, overall, for me, the light very low gearing with tuff tires worked better than a heavier full suspension bike. I'm not kidding, I think I pushed 20 miles. Heck it only weighed 20 pounds before adding the heaver tires, saddle, 3 frame bags, water bottles and dropper post. It was like a walker, held you up and steadied you in the rainy night when you tripped on a rock or root you couldn't see in the dark. I really didn't need the dropper post for the way I rode this. You could stop and put the seat up and down as my goal was just to finish. I did like the dropper because you had to mount and dismount so many times and that made it easier, but I could have lived very well without it. You need to drink a lot. I had 5 large cans of Arizona Energy Drink with ginseng, 3 cokes, 3 beers, half a shot of Irish whiskey, 4 bottles of water, half a bottle of pickle juice, 2 cans of V8 juice and one bottle of a coconut milk energy drink. Eating is hard as everyone seemed to feel pukey from exertion. The whiskey was a bad idea as it made me more puky but I drank it about 6 miles from the finish as I thought it might help with the pushing. You need real food besides the sweet gel stuff they are pushing as the latest and greatest. instead of Gell (like Hammer or Carbo Rocket) I used peanut butter that was manufactured with added flax seed oil and mixed it with honey and maple syrup. I put it in zip bags in a front shoulder pack. I also had a nut and fruit mix, pharmacy grade tubes of glucose for diabetics with low blood sugar (expensive but it goes into your blood stream right away), a dark chocolate bar, two granola bars and Rice Krispie bars. In my drop bag I had two cheese sandwiches (I could only eat one), a can of sardines, jerky, Carmel Corn and sausage sticks. I refilled food into my chest bag from my drop bag. I think baby food in the squeeze tubes might be good to take along but I didn't try any. I stopped about every 2 hours for a short brake. For leg cramps (I got them) I had Morton's lite salt which is half potassium, magnesium tablets, calcium tablets and pickle juice. I took these electrolytes about every two hours but had to ride for many miles with the seat way up high to avoid cramps. It settled down for the last 25 miles. Something like this is very doable with the right bike and attitude. If anyone around you starts talking negative, dump them. I was a little discouraged when I had the hardest part of the course, the last 15 miles to do, in the dark, when it started to rain about as had as it rains and there was fog so the visibility was extremely bad and the soil is clay so it got like grease. I figured I could walk 15 miles so I just kept going, hauling and occasionally striding (like a kids no pedal bike). The light bike really came into it's own here. I got passed by riders in the 100 and 200 mile class and it was unbelievable to watch the stuff they rode. Two guys were riding the 200 on single speeds and had encountered a mountain lion. They really got going fast then. Thats not me. I had a 2 x 10 gear set up with the low being 21 x 46 and the high side 36 x 11, worked good. I had a headlight on the bike and one on the helmet and 4 batteries. The cell phone high capacity recharge batteries lasted through all this and I also used one on my GPS when that battery died. This is the only way to go for batteries, the other systems only last two or three hours. I ended out pushing with a guy who only had one headlight and one battery and he was in the dark. My lights kept him able to see enough. I offered him my helmet with the light but he didn't want it. I never really thought about quitting, but a lot of people did quit. As long as you have food and nutrition and are not hurt you can keep moving through space in some manner. The right bike for your style is the most important thing, then hydration and nutrition and then going slow and pacing, unless you are racing. I walked over many things I had ridden over in the past, no reason to get hurt because you are too tired to ride an obstacle cleanly and strongly. These endurance races are always worse than you can imagine. Once you make the last cutoff in time then you have it made for the rest of the race, just keep moving, as slow as you can. Ha.
     
    RustyGold and Klunkruiser like this.

Share This Page