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This old pepper mill

Discussion in 'ROAD & TOURING BIKES' started by peejus, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. deorman

    deorman

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    Fairfax, VA
  2. us56456712

    us56456712

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    Around here it is $100 for blasting and coating a frame. That is the best alternative. You would have that much or almost that much in your paint doing it yourself and powder coating is faster. Good Idea. The $50 for the bottom bracket is not bad either. I have one powder coated frame. Here it is mocked up. I have all the parts, new wheels different seat and bars. The fork needs work and I will paint it but the frame looks good.
    [​IMG]
     
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  3. peejus

    peejus

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    When I strip a frame, I usually use a wirecup brush in a angle grinder and just go to town until the job is done.
    Rattle can primer, then color coats, then clear coats.

    I am not unfamiliar, back in my salad days when I was an industrial mechanic, I spent time in the finishing shop prepping and painting these huge machines.
    I am quite adept and familiar with epoxy paint and most other types.
    Thing is.. what a lot of people fail to do when they consider costs to a project is calculating in the cost of thier own labor, as in how much is your time worth to you.
    This is hobby work, so it should be negligible.

    It's like homebrewing beer. When home brewers come to me and talk about brewing at home to save money on beer I have to remind them that by the time you calculate your labor, material, and equipment, you are lucky to break even. There is so much good, fresh craft brew on the market now, there simply isn't a point.
    You do it because you like doing it.

    Farming out this frame to be blasted and powder coated would ultimately cost me the same in time, energy, and material if I were to strip and rattle can it my self.

    I haven't had a chance to bring the frame by the place yet, but chances are, it'll cost me more in waiting for it to get done. And I can probably trade beer and beer related stuff to bring the cost down further.

    In the meentime, I can focus on the cleanup and rebuilding of the bikes other components


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  4. us56456712

    us56456712

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    I used to use the cup wire brush on my angle grinder. It works fast too. But I found it not necessary, I can't believe the results I got just prepping the old paint and priming over it. I even pained the blue Schwinn I posted a picture of this way. It had a horrible rattle can paint job on it, full of drips and I just sanded them down and used 3 cans of primer and it turned out as good as factory. I still think if you can get a good price on the powder coat that is the way to go. Some people don't like the look of the powder but I think it is fine.
    I used to make home brew on an almost industrial scale back in the early 1970s. I kept a log and developed recipes. I used to buy 100 pound sacks of barley and sprout and roast it myself. I made beer much better than any of the craft housed I have tried. The stuff they sell is like my failures. I only made two types, a double stout' and a bohemian style larger that was better than any beer I had in Bohemia or Germany. It was very expensive to make. I used to buy cases of 100 gross of caps. I had quite a following. I quit and sold all my stuff. I couldn't do it again as I tossed out all my recipes and notes.
     
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  5. peejus

    peejus

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    Sorry to hear all those recipes are lost! I'm trying to reintroduce our bohemian pilsner to the marketplace.
    The frame was dropped off at the place today..
    That was an adventure..
    As I pulled up, a younger gentleman wandered up to the open garage door to greet me...

    Sight unseen dude says " do you work for Legend Brewing company? "

    I respond. "Yes"

    "Are you... Peejus? "

    Uhm. .. yeah?

    "DUDE!! I KNEW IT! I follow you on instagram!"

    Hey! Thanks!

    He turns to the confused guy next to him and says " This is the Peejus! He posts the most amazing ....!"


    So.. I have a fan it would appear...

    I just thought I would share that but not amusement. . I keep hearing I'm famous.. hopefully it turns into a good deal on the blast and spray on the frame.
    It's a 4 to 6 week turn around on side work, but I'm hoping that it being a basic white frame for a "famous" person that can drop off free beer might speed up the process. Other wise, I'll update this post as I clean up the various stock bits.

    I'm also working on a moterized bike project, as well as the old german city bike.

    But this is the hotrod. ..

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  6. us56456712

    us56456712

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    Sounds like you are busy and fulfilled. Cool how people know your handle, sort of like CB in the old days. You must have removed the stubborn cotter. Someone just gave me a Hercules camel back frame, fork, stem, seat post, handle bar, cottered crank set, grips, chain and chain guard. It was very rusty and everything had been soaked in primer. I have a homemade cotter remover made from the type of furniture clamp that uses a pipe. The pipe is about 5-6 inches long with a hole drilled in one of the clamp ends for the cotter to be squeezed into. The Hercules cotters came out like a charm, you never can tell. This home built cotter remover doesn't apply the force that a big vice and a socket does but as a first resort I always try it as it is so easy to use.

    I quit making beer when my first kid was born in 1980. My brewery became the nursery. I used to sprout barley, dry it and burn it in the oven for my double stout. My wife hated it as it smoked and stunk up the whole house, but bless her heart, she tolerated it with no complaining, just looks of disapproval. My bohemian beer was made from a powered malt I got from a brew catalogue but I can't remember the type or the type of hops or the finishing hops. I gave away my notes when I sold out, but there were years of experimenting involved. At the time I lived in Sault, Michigan, just across the international bridge from Sault, Ontario. There was a book store there that had books from the UK and I got a UK book on brewing UK beer. There was a recipe in that book for duplicating each type of beer from the UK. I remember Newcastle Brown Ale is made from water that percolated through lime stone so you have to add plaster of paris to the water. To make Irish double stout you had to use some flaked barley. I'm not a fan of UK beer. A year ago my wife and I bicycle toured England on a self guided tour, we just rented the bikes. I also toured England in 1965. I never liked the beer, which to me is similar to all the stuff in vogue now by micro breweries. The English here don't think our micro breweries make a beer similar to theirs but I think the micro brews are more similar to English beer than USA commercial beer. It all tastes like my failed batches that I gave away, but to each his own. I do like a more lightly hopped double stout and that is what I made, but it had a lot more body then Guinness. I had friends back then from a family where everyone went into industrial chemistry. I still ride bikes with one of them. Anyway, the bike chemist buddy had a cousin who worked for a company that made the Miller extract used to flavor their beer. I was able to get a test tube of something that looked like a cross between molasses and tar. I was informed to use 200 parts per million to flavor my beer. "What is that" I asked, answer one or two drops from an eye dropper per 5 gallons. The beer tasted like a home brew/Miller. I never tried to make good beer with it, just fast batches. I tossed out the test tube because with a little more effort you could make something better. When I first stared making beer in the 60s you could buy 30 oz cans of Blue Ribbon Hopped Malt Extract at the grocery store for cheap. The recipe on the can called for sugar and bread yeast, a real depression hold over. Real bad beer but it was cheap. I used to buy the Blue Ribbon Malt Extract with food stamps and sometimes a matronly check out gal would give me a hard time about using food stamps to make beer. I would argue that I used it for pancakes. The bad good old days.
     
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  7. horsefarmer

    horsefarmer

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    [​IMG]
    So I'm reading this thread and all this beer talk and then that last line gets to me. "The bad good old days."
    I flash back to stopping of at the corner market and pickin up cheap 40's to take back to the dorm and leave em chill outside on the windowsill. Yep, those were the days...:thumbsup:
     
  8. Bicycle808

    Bicycle808

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    FYI, that bike probably has a 28.0mm diameter seat tube; closest you'll get out of a "normal" front derailer is 1.125", which is 28.6mm. It'll work, but you'll probably need to shim it.
     
  9. deorman

    deorman

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    It seems that old 40 lb. Schwinn 10-spds are good for something after all. :crazy:
     
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  10. us56456712

    us56456712

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    I broke my Simplex plastic clamp on my Peugeot so I used a bottom feed Japanese one that must have come from a Huffy, etc. I have several that have 28mm and I think they must be from old American road bikes. Schwinn Varsity had Huret front derailleurs and there are a lot of them on eBay. Not the best derailleur and it says Schwinn Approved but it is French.
     
  11. peejus

    peejus

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    Had to check on my thread because it's been a few weeks. The project is on hold while waiting on paint.
    Remember how I said I was getting a deal because it was being put in as side work?

    Apperntly it's still off to the side :D

    It's going to be $75 for the sandblasting and powder coat when it's done however.
    Meenwhile, I'm working in turning a wallmart huffy into a moped and tuning up a couple of other old road bikes.

    And of course, life goes on in the old beer mines. The bottling line needs constant attention to keep up with demand. I have a lot of overtime on this coming paycheck.
    The brewery I work for just celebrated 22 years of existence this last weekend
    That's why it's nice to get home and drink a beer or four and mess around with old bikes.

    The closest I get to bringing my work home with me nowadays is the occasional one gallon batch of Mead, cider or summer fruit wine.

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  12. peejus

    peejus

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    It's so shiny!

    [​IMG]

    The cost was $60 cash. Nice appliance white so rattle can matching shouldn't be an issue.

    I'm thinking an all white and chrome motif. I can get all white tires and a white chain would be nice if I can find one in 3/32.

    All the chrome bits are getting time on the buffing wheel.


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  13. 71SC360

    71SC360

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    Speaking of breweries.. is Legend Brewing company still using the bottle caps with the unicorn on it?
     
  14. peejus

    peejus

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    Yep! I'm currently staring at 20k of them! Thinking about making a head tube badge or something?

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  15. peejus

    peejus

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    [​IMG]

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  16. 71SC360

    71SC360

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    Hoping, maybe they've changed it. It's not a bad design, they've just been using it now for a few years. Just the bottle cap collector in me being curious..
     
  17. peejus

    peejus

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    Gotcha, yep.. company logo, these caps have been used for the past 14 years, I get what you are saying.
    The label art has been given a facelift recently

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  18. peejus

    peejus

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    So! I got the old Pepper mill road worthy again!
    Some parts from a donar bike helped with the assembly. I was hoping to use the alloy quill stem and drop bars from that bike, but alas, galvanic bonding has caused the stem and the neck of that bike to be quite siezed..
    I'll eventually get it undone, but in the meen time, I have another quill on the way.
    Im kinda digging the flipped albatross bars anyway. I have cork bar wrap ready to go, but I'm waiting on fitting the new stem before I wrap it. It'll match the seat.
    Tires, rims, and front derailleur also came from the donar bike.
    All the chrome and aluminum parts were disassembled, cleaned and lubed. New cables as well.
    I'm hoping to eventually redo the cables with all white shields but for now, it's a nice contrast with the white paint and shined chrome.
    I'm also thinking about all white tired as well, but these tires are virtually brand new and they cleaned up very well except for some cracking on the side wall.
    the donar bike was a ladies Raleigh capri, that looks like it was ridden a few times before being left to rot in the rain.. seriously, these tires still have the injection molding flash.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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