Science!

Discussion in 'BUILT FROM SCRATCH' started by OCD, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. OCD

    OCD

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    379
    Location:
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada
    In January I changed work sites and although there is a nice bike room to park in, Simply Red turned out to be longer than the bike room was wide! Knowing I wasn't making many friends due to the space it took up (totally didn't fit in the wall racks) I decided to try a few new things. I knew it had to be shorter, plus I've never built a bike with anything but round tube and spurred on by a comment on Endless Sphere about how e-bikes are looking more like science experiments and less like bicycles these days, I thought I'd try my hand at something a bit more angular and 'Mad Max' looking than most of my builds.

    I never sketched it out, just made it up as I went along and it kept morphing from what I envisioned as I built.
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    The original plan was to mount both batteries in the frame triangle with the controller under the rear rack. Then I thought "why not make the rear rack part of the frame?" Later I found that although both batteries fit as planned, you couldn't insert the key in one as the frame was in the way...Doh! Time to rethink....
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    First time on it's wheels. I'm running a Golden Motor Pro 901 motor, 3000 watt 80 amp controller and two Golden Motor 48 volt 10 amp battery packs to supply enough juice.
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    You can see I used 1" x 1/2" rectangular tube for the upper frame and chainstays. Originally I planned round tube for the chainstays which would have interfered with the chain line if connected to the lower front section. Normally I build stretched cruisers, I'm not used to building bikes this short.
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    Basically finished here. I've added a Cycle Analyst V3 to monitor electrical things, employed the unused wooden front fender from Red for the rear wheel, Avid BB7 brakes front/rear and a voltage step down to run the 12 volt LED tail and headlights. The nearly vertical seat post looks a bit awkward to me, but originally it gave me room to put both batteries up front (darn key switch anyway). I may make a black laid back post as the seat doesn't move back as it moves up. Sometimes I envy those who can design something on a computer and have a CNC machine do most of the work, but that doesn't speak Hot Rod to me. Top speed on 48 volts (the controller can take up to 84 volts) is 54.6 km/hr with a range of about 40 km. I've got lights to mount and a few more details to sort out including a plush air fork I may put on to try.
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    OneHorsePower and LukeTheJoker like this.
  2. LukeTheJoker

    LukeTheJoker Moderator

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Capital of the Outback, Australia
    I bet that is a fun ride! Great work commuter!

    Luke.
     
  3. OCD

    OCD

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    379
    Location:
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada
    Upgraded the wheels and tires! Made the move to 19" aluminum moped rims and 2.75" wide motorcycle tires. The ride is very smooth, with improved traction and braking control. When you're riding a 30 mph, 100 lb bike, you don't want to leave things to chance.
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  4. OneHorsePower

    OneHorsePower

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
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    2,714
    Location:
    Montréal Canada (Québec)
    thats awesome ! , wish i knew electronics or have the patience to learn it
    are you planning some panels to cover it ?
     
  5. OCD

    OCD

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    379
    Location:
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada
    This was built mainly to use parts I already had. I was experimenting with the idea of building several bikes that I could slide the batteries on and off so one set of packs would work on several builds. The original plan was to have both packs together in the frame's triangle but access to the keys was too tight. This is my all weather rat rod for commuting to work on the foul weather days. I have abandoned my use of LiFePo4 packs in favour of the new technology built of 18650 cells as used in the Tesla cars. I can now get 3x the capacity (range) in the same space and weight as one of these packs (30amp/hr vs. 10amp/hr). Check out the e-bobber build to see the difference. I have samples of new motors coming soon from China, one is rated at 3000 watts continuous with 12,000 peaks, should provide impressive performance! :thumbsup:
     
  6. deorman

    deorman

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
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    Location:
    Fairfax, VA
    :39: I can't decide whether that's beautiful or hideous. :grin:
     

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