Not much original here a real mish mash but what about the frame?

Jul 30, 2013
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Yours has been cannibalized to the point it's now a cool bike, but not a collectible. The rims are unsightly, but they're also steel and surprisingly strong--I expect the wheel can be made rideable. Replace the Uniroyals with any 26" tire that is measured in DECIMAL notation (not fractions). The internal bearing groups could probably stand some cleaning and re-greasing, as well. If you have those skills, great. If not, folks here will instruct you, or point you to a good source. You said the wheels were not quite true, but this can sometimes be mistaken for hub bearing wear. Lift the bike off the ground and wiggle the wheel side-to-side. If it moves, the axle cones are loose and usually just need snugged-up.
 
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Yours has been cannibalized to the point it's now a cool bike, but not a collectible. The rims are unsightly, but they're also steel and surprisingly strong--I expect the wheel can be made rideable. Replace the Uniroyals with any 26" tire that is measured in DECIMAL notation (not fractions). The internal bearing groups could probably stand some cleaning and re-greasing, as well. If you have those skills, great. If not, folks here will instruct you, or point you to a good source. You said the wheels were not quite true, but this can sometimes be mistaken for hub bearing wear. Lift the bike off the ground and wiggle the wheel side-to-side. If it moves, the axle cones are loose and usually just need snugged-up.
Thanks I'm going to tinker with it today and Check the bearings and such. I like the idea of keeping the original wheels. Ive never rebuilt hubs with bearings but I'm pretty good at finding info on the web and not afraid to try thnaks for the post.
 
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I think you are right about it may just be the cones that need tightening Good Call. The rust is only surface on the rims and the spokes look fine so it looks like I should be able to get them ridable:happy:. Curious why Tires in Decimal only ? Any Idea what size I will most likely need Thanks Chris
 
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Not sure what tools you have at your disposal, but slender cone wrenches make hub service much simpler. Apart from those and a chain breaker, I'm not sure these vintage bikes need any specialty tools, unlike their modern counterparts.
 
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Not sure what tools you have at your disposal, but slender cone wrenches make hub service much simpler. Apart from those and a chain breaker, I'm not sure these vintage bikes need any specialty tools, unlike their modern counterparts.
I have used come wenches many years ago I’ll have to get some new ones thanks.
 
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Oh... I still owe you an explanation on the tire size, and I think this chart helps make things clearer. All five of these tires are 26", but the hole in the center of each are different. The ballooner bikes use the last tire on the right--a bead seat diameter of 559 mm. They're easy to identify because their width is measured using decimals. The others never are.

tired.png
 
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If you don't want to buy bike specific cone wrenches, just grab a regular one in the size you need down at the pawn shop, and grind it down. Or grind an adjustable wrench, that's what I've been using.
 
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Oh... I still owe you an explanation on the tire size, and I think this chart helps make things clearer. All five of these tires are 26", but the hole in the center of each are different. The ballooner bikes use the last tire on the right--a bead seat diameter of 559 mm. They're easy to identify because their width is measured using decimals. The others never are.

View attachment 138066
Thanks for the heads up on the tires very helpful . Best you know I shouldnt have any problem getting the bead to seat on these rims with that tire?
 

nosferatu1381

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Is it a good Idea to try the rebuild the front and rear hubs I've never done this kind before?
when i am taking something apart I put down the parts in order on box tape, that way if I get pulled away from it i can put tape over it and drop it all in a crate for later. Those hubs are really simple and there are plenty of exploded views of them on the internet. It has saved me from a few "basket case" "take it to someone who knows what they are doing" when i rebuilt some of this stuff in the toy box
IMG_20200908_155552.jpg
 
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1963 Snyder made Rollfast or Hawthorne frame. The chainwheel is Murray but is very similar to Snyder. I believe your chain guard is original because of the mounting bracket but theres no pic of the whole thing. The fork is good, not what came with it, but good because you can fit a bigger tire than a 1.75. I would suggest going with 26 x 2.125, beach cruiser size and plentiful. The smoother tread the better the ride on pavement.

As for your hubs, over at the CABE I found a good thread that has a diagram and info on your rear hub: https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/perry-b-100-help-please.139288/

Usually I take a pic of the parts and make sure I remember what goes back where when I take them apart. I usually just clean and relube the parts and back together it goes with no problem. Yours may not have that much wear and ride like brand new. Once they are adjusted just right they will go for years without a problem.
 
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