Micargi Cyclone fatbike

Discussion in 'FAT BIKES' started by Stevil, Oct 20, 2017.

  1. Stevil

    Stevil

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    Ebay has a Macargi stretch Fatbike frame for sale @ $169. Turns out to be the frame for an electric
    bike priced @ $2500 ! Sorry no pics but somebody check this out to see if we can swap Dolomite
    parts on to a Way Cooler frame. No doubt a heavier,longer,more cumbersome bike then we'd like,but
    Way Cooler !!...Stevil:crazy:
     
  2. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2017
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  3. c1run1

    c1run1

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    they build great cruisers Love them and cheap
     
  4. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6

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    I considered buying a cool aluminum fat frame and transferring the parts from my fat Mongoose.
    -I think you will need to use a triple tree fork with that Micargi frame. Most other parts should swap.
     
  5. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6

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    Another thing I noticed...the Micargi frame appears to require a solid rear axle. If your Dolemite has a skewer on the rear wheel, you may need to buy a solid axle.
    -Also, I think the Dolemite has a bolt-on rear derailleur. The Micargi frame will require an axle mounted derailleur.
    -Does the Micargi frame have a rear disk mount? if not, you will need an adaptor for your rear disk.
    -You will need a longer chain, rear brake and shifter cable (unless you move the shifter to the top tube or seat tube, which I have done on some bikes).
    -None of these things are a huge expense, especially if you get used parts. Its just good to know what is required up front.
    -I have built several bikes from the frame up. There are always a few surprises and delays, but its the best way to have all the things you really want on a bike within your budget, IMHO.
     
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  6. Dr. Tankenstein

    Dr. Tankenstein

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    I’m not sure the Micargi frame will take a rim over 80mm and the Mongoose hubs are really wide as well.
    I was going to do the same with my TSP Oldster, but the ‘Beast’ parts wouldn’t fit the frame, I donated the Beast last Christmas to a church and bought a set of 80mm rims.

    Many of the Macargi frames are limited to 3” (80mm) rim


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  7. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6

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  8. Dr. Tankenstein

    Dr. Tankenstein

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    It has 80mm rims though, which narrows the 4” tire a bit


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  9. us56456712

    us56456712

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    Location:
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    I have 80 mm rims and 3.8 inch tires and they are very good for what I ride on. They work well in sand and well packed snow. For softer single track snow they are way too narrow. I'm thinking of actually going to 60 mm carbon tubeless rims as these would work well for my tire size and the type of riding I do. I would never ride in conditions that require 100 rims and 4.8 tires so I have backed down a bit and it works extremely well for what I ride on. I can ride in the summer on single track with this rig but I only use it as a guest bike as it is too heavy for me in the summer. As you can see by the picture the tire sidewall is not pulled in very much. I'm running 8 pounds of tire pressure in the picture. I'm taking a warm up break before I go back out to finish my ride and you can see there is 2 to 3 inches of loose snow over hard packed snow over ice so these tires and rims are perfect. You cannot ride a 2 inch tire in these conditions. If 4 inch tires fit with 80 mm rims it should be a cool bike and it should go over anything that you can pedal the Micargi through or over. You won't have to pick a spot or line, just aim and pedal. The bike will be heavy and a little cumbersome but the higher the pressure they easier fat tires are to steer, but then they don't go through soft stuff. Good luck with your build. DSCN0280.JPG
     
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