M3 final derivation (deviation?)

Discussion in 'BUILD OFF 6 FINISHED BIKES' started by Twisted Root, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Twisted Root

    Twisted Root

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    So here it is...

    Not where I expected, but very successful in many of the goals I had set forth.

    The biggest change of plans was to keep the original paint. I know that many on this list are used to seeing old bikes, and thus are comfortable with strong mods, and creative changes. But as I hit an early prototype/test-drive phase, I found myself very attracted to the old, chipped, rusty red paint. This is a Rat Rod after all. And as I rode the thing around town, it got a lot of attention, from 10 y.o. boys to 60 y.o. men (and even some chicks), and everyone, unanamously said "Don't paint it!" And so I didn't. And that meant scrapping not only the satin black frame, but the brushed stainless "tank" plate, etc (but I digress). In the end, it became more typical (archetypical) a Rat than I had expected...And I'm glad.

    Lets look at some shot's and maybe I'll throw out some other observations as I go...
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    I was going to paint over that Cheezy, biker, iron cross on the chainring...but once those white walls went on, and I knew I was staying with the old red...I knew it had to stay. Classic!

    Yes, the reflector is busted out of the pedal. That happened almost immediately. Partially, it's because those pedal are cheap junk (but not inexpensive junk). The reflector plastic is thin and brittle, it broke leaning it up against something, not even from falling over. With more time I hope to replace both reflectors with appropriate beer battle caps (did I just loose any chance of winning this contest?). The other thing that contributed to this breakage is that the front wheel wants to flop over very easily. Probably something about the increased fork rake with the 700C front tire. It's really the only frustrating thing about the functionality of the bike...hard to push around or lean up against things...it wants to flop sideways and fall over.
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    Grips are old inner-tubes. They actually feel great, and shine up cool with Armourall. Let me know if you want tips on how to install.

    The three speed hub is SOOO darn cool! It shifts like butter, and makes the bike fast and functional in my hilly town. In fact, I cant believe how smoothly and modern this bike runs. Besides having the weight of a retro cruiser (with internal hub gearing), it really rolls like a modern ride. Fast and functional were my main criteria for the build (nothing against those toe-scraper low-riders you guys are building...they're beautiful. But I can get across town and over hills with ease.)

    I've seen some other great builds in the finals list. Good Job Y'all. And this is my first build, so I have no fantasies of winning (but feel free to vote...I'd be honored).But building was fun and I just love my new bike.

    Ben
     
  2. gowjobs

    gowjobs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,373
    Location:
    Ventura, CA
    I'm not sure that you'll end up receiving a vote from me, but know that you're in my top ten. Lovin' the look of this ride.
     
  3. Twisted Root

    Twisted Root

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    OK, here are some other shots. I don't expect them to increase my chances of winning the contest, since using feminine beauty to sway the voters is, well, cheating. But I love my sweetie, and she was very supportive of me doing this project (the perfect woman). She actually thinks the bike is cool (I don't think she's just humoring me).

    Besides, she's a little camera shy (with no good reason...her twin sister is a supermodel), so I tricked her into posing by saying I needed shots for the build-off.

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    Her cruiser is the next for the chop shop. Bye bye department store Univega. Perhaps it's time for red rims and springer fork.
     
  4. herr_rudolf

    herr_rudolf

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    1,810
    Location:
    Eindhoven, Holland.
    RATROD!
    Well done.
     
  5. KOTA

    KOTA

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Messages:
    5,257
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    +1 ...NICE! This bike gets right to the point. Lean and mean.
     
  6. subadrew

    subadrew

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    Denver, CO

    What bike? =P
     
  7. Twisted Root

    Twisted Root

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Thanks to everyone appreciating my bike.

    And to Subadrew, congrats on keeping your priorities straight. It made her giggle (once I explained it).
     
  8. Twisted Root

    Twisted Root

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    I also wanted to clarify/brag how amazing it was the the vintage 333 Shimano shifter worked perfectly with the modern SRAM hub. My mechanic guaranteed me that it was pure coincidence/good luck, and not an industry standard. Consider that a good sign for other 3-speed projects

    I had plans to locate the shifter on the lower top tube, about 2/3 back towards the seat. I knew it would take an lengthening of the shift lever to get the knob above the upper top tube. But as I rode the bike around, I realized that a longer lever would jab me in the thigh (or worse) every time I put a foot down at a stop. I also thought it might look a bit cheezy lengthened. And, if I didnt like it, I would have ruined the shifter lever by cutting it. In the end (as you see) I opted for the seat tube location. Low, sleek, short. Now Shifting is by reaching down, as per old down-tube racing bikes (or adjusting the carbs while riding a vintage motorcycle...been there done that).

    I like it, but am interested in what other's think of my choice.
     

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