"Dragst-Her Too"

Mar 26, 2012
7,551
14,665
Maplewood, MN
Rating - 100%
5   0   0
I'm intrigued with the idea, but have not tried it. I'd like to see some examples too, if anyone has used this process. I have used 2 x 4 s to straighten frames and forks, they work well and don't leave 'marks'. Using the broader surface area of a sturdy board like that doesn't put all the pressure on a concentrated spot like a pipe or bar would.
 
Aug 14, 2019
704
1,671
62
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Are you planning to paint the bike or use the existing finish, is it factory paint?

When cutting up a frame, I managed to put a flat spot in one of the seat stays. I took a piece of pine, cut a notch (against the grain) to fit the tube, and used that to take out the flat spot by firmly tapping it with a hammer. It worked perfectly with no damage. But as always, no guarantees.

I think this would work for you if you added two braces to fit snugly between the upper and lower tubes. Cut notches to fit both the upper and lower tubes, position them at the start and end point. You could even cut your notches a little larger and put rags between the block and frame for protection.

Then using the first block with the notch to slowly work the tubes flat.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: OddJob
Sep 7, 2014
3,172
6,166
52
Columbus OH
Rating - 100%
6   0   0
Has anyone tried that? I'm curious about it... but cannot screw up this frame.
I'd suggest trying it on a disposable frame. Squeezing those tubes down will tend to tilt the head tube forward and change the angle slightly. Could also cause the tubes to twist at the welds.

No experience with this but it would make me nervous on something I didn't want to break/re-weld.
 
  • Like
Reactions: OddJob
Jun 11, 2012
4,477
4,374
48
Visalia, CA
Rating - 100%
63   0   0
I don't have a spare frame. It took me long enough to find this one. The crap thing is... I gave away one of these frames a couple years ago!
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
If it really looks like poop, I'll have to send out the housing and shroud to get re-chromed. That was my initial thought. But the housing really isn't THAT bad. I think once I give it some love, and some new decals, it'll really look a lot better.
I'll try to find some fairly lightweight, flexible plastic. hmmmmm Maybe Hobby Lobby?
As a former plastic modeler I have worked with styrene sheet to build things. I bought it at hobby shops specializing in RC and plastic models.
 
Aug 14, 2019
704
1,671
62
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
As a former plastic modeler I have worked with styrene sheet to build things. I bought it at hobby shops specializing in RC and plastic models.
The "For Sale" signs you see in hardware stores are made of styrene, but it seems to be more flexible than the sheets from places like Evergreen. If you plan things right and don't mind some sanding and shaping, you can make almost anything out of sheet styrene. MEK works great for cementing styrene, just be safe with it.

The body, fuel cell, wheels, tires and engine block on this are all made from sheet styrene.

PB070648.jpg
PB070649.jpg
PB070650.jpg
PB070651.jpg
 
Last edited:
Jun 11, 2012
4,477
4,374
48
Visalia, CA
Rating - 100%
63   0   0
It doesn’t say “styrene”, but I got a couple sheets of 0.015 thick plastic in the model section of Hobby Lobby. I’m assuming Gorilla Glue brand super glue will hold that well enough.

I’m going to work on that this weekend. I guess the biggest question I’m going to have is, once made and attached, if it will be ok to spray chrome on? I’ll have to ask the plastic chrome guy.
 
Aug 14, 2019
704
1,671
62
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
It doesn’t say “styrene”, but I got a couple sheets of 0.015 thick plastic in the model section of Hobby Lobby. I’m assuming Gorilla Glue brand super glue will hold that well enough.

I’m going to work on that this weekend. I guess the biggest question I’m going to have is, once made and attached, if it will be ok to spray chrome on? I’ll have to ask the plastic chrome guy.
Spray chrome as in paint, or the process they use to chrome plastic such as model parts?

Model parts are usually coated with a fairly thick coat of clear lacquer before they are plated. The reason for this, the lacquer fills a lot of small voids and levels things. Any imperfections are greatly magnified by the chrome. You should be able to do body work on the part, then clear it before sending it out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CRASH and OddJob