Cannondale 3.0 resto question, HELP!

Jul 16, 2017
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Restoring/re-assembling for a friend who has had it for years. I'm impressed by this sr300, never seen one til now. I dont normally repair high end bikes and this one has me baffled. The rear hub on the cassette side has the mounting axle bolt(?) that is too short to put a nut on. How does this work? Plus, it looks like there may be some hardware missing from the inside of the cassette? HELP
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Jun 13, 2015
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Quick release—you're missing the QR skewer axle that slides inside the hub axle. That radial pattern of scratches in the paint around the drop out are scars from the knurls. If you can find it, the original would be better than a replacement as newer alloy QRs are not as robust as the old steel that also had a better cam design, though it's not like it's the end of the world to use a newer one, either. If you have to get a newer one, try to get steel with the handle that sticks out from the QR cam nut, like a leafy stem on the top of a fruit rather than the style where the handle is integrated into the QR cam nut.

As for missing parts, it looks like you're missing the nut to keep the cassette away from the frame and provide the clamping surface for the inside of the drop out.
 
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May 10, 2016
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Also, that’s not a cassette. It’s a free wheel. If the axle is properly spaced, ie to work for quick release, you shouldn’t have the issue at the drops. Sheldon Brown has a good article or hub spacing that addresses some of what l think you’re running into
 
Jul 16, 2017
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Thanks guys! I totally forgot the would be a quick release!! So it will work even though there is no "bolt" length sticking out?

Do you have a link to a QR and the nut to keep the spacing between the frame and cassette(?) ?
 
May 10, 2016
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Usually it would be the cone, then a spacer, then the nut. The axle should land about half way into the drop out. I’d suggest removing the freewheel so you can see whats what.
Looks to be an older aluminum frame, my guess is spaced at 126. Being aluminum, you do not want to over space the wheel and ‘spread’ the frame.
As far as a nut and quick release, I’d try your LBS.

This has info relevant —
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Yeah, the axle is the right length. You need a spacer and nut that fills the space between the dropouts as closely as will go without stressing the frame, and a skewer and springs. I agree that you should pull the freewheel cluster so you can clean/grease/replace if needed the bearing, and torque the locking nut properly without crushing or leaving play in the bearing. Most bike shops will have the parts and freewheel puller that you need. I personally would replace the spoke guard, although a lot of guys just toss them in the trash or recycle bin and run without one.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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I'm one of those guys—for reasons I don't really understand, I passionately hate spoke guards—that's what derailleur limit stops are for.
Pro: I once had a stick sneak in between the sprocket and derailleur cage and was glad I had one, as it dumped the chain behind the cluster. Petty rare occurrence I'll admit.
Con: Steel ones rust, can't clean it without pulling the freewheel.
Plastic ones dry out and turn yellow, then crack up and fall apart.
Aluminium ones, probably the best, but I've only ever seen one.
 
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Jun 13, 2015
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Those hold the derailleur hanger—it's a separate piece with the idea being that if it gets damaged, that part can be replaced instead of having a damaged frame.
 
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Mar 5, 2014
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My bad. I now see the "pins" are hex-head machine bolts/locaters going thru the dropout....didn't see the bolt heads at 1st...:whew: Usually, the fixing bolts are flush................
Yea, those threads look stripped for the derailleur.
 
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