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I just came up on this bike, which is somewhat mish-mashed, with a SA 3-speed coaster brake stamped as 1960 and the only other marking anywhere so far is AMF down the non-drive side of the fork. It appears to have originally been gold w/black graphics/trim. The fenders appear to be OE as well. I've looked around quite a bit already, any ideas? Thanks!
AMF.jpg
 
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The fenders and rear rack look the same as some of the 50's/60's cantilever frame Roadmaster/AMF bikes. That front rack was on one I saw when fishing as well.

The front brake caliper is a Weinmann Schwinn Approved, so I'm pretty sure the Sturmey rear hub was not OE on that frame either. It's getting a heavy duty chrome coaster brake wheelset I recently acquired. Those fenders and rear rack are highly restorable, as is the crankset. I'll be using something besides the ape hangers and that stem for the front end and the front rack is going to the parts bin.
 
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RustyGold

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You can see the CWC dna in the frame, it is an AMF and 1960-ish sounds reasonable (search for amf skyrider, royal master, jet pilot, etc...and you'll see this frame used under many model names). Up til '63, I believe, the serial number should still follow a CWC format. If the chainring is original, that could mean this was branded as a Shelby (this became an AMF brand as well)...or it is just a Shelby or aftermarket chainring added later (most likely, I don't think that chainring was used on AMF Shelby's).
 
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That's an AMF early 60's middleweight frame. It has the seat stem that tightens like a handlebar stem. There should be a serial number on the left dropout, starting with a letter, a G is 57, H is 58, No I, J is 59, K is 60, L is 61, M is 62, N for 63 on the chart I use.
It has a Schwinn fork and the fenders may be the right ones. The front looks peaked which is right, but I can't tell if the rear fender is also peaked.
The handlebar stem looks added along with the rear rack. The rear rim looks like the dropcenter I've seen an many of those early 60's AMF, but the front rim looks standard, maybe replaced along with the original forks. I've never seen a 3 speed AMF of that kind, but it's possible. I see new stuff all the time.
The seat looks bad but has a crash rail and might just need to be padded and covered.
 

RustyGold

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It has a Schwinn fork and the fenders may be the right ones.
May not be a Schwinn fork, especially since KCI states that it has AMF on one of the fork blades. The AMF Shelbys used bladed forks with that 'imperial' chainring into the latest of '50s. I haven't seen a Shelby cantilever in that time period, but if the hub is original, it could be some kind of transitional 1960ish AMF Shelby cantilever...or the chainring and forks could have been harvested off a Shelby at some point :grin:.
 
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I did find a pic of an AMF Flying Falcon that was set up as a 3-speed coaster, with all of the same apparent add-ons including the chainring. I kinda thought that was Shelby-ish. Both fenders are peaked and the fork does say AMF, with arrow-like points above and below it. The front wheel is definitely era Schwinn, with a scripted hub and ISO 559 steel rim. The serial number on the drive-side dropout begins with M, so it's a 1962. Oh yeah, the original color was red, which matches the Flying Falcon pic I found. Thank you for all of your wisdom, gentlemen! I think we've got it nailed down.

The stem bolt sheared, but the stem style seatpost bolt turned properly. The headset cap nut didn't want to turn, but I figured that would be the case. I need to get some more HD cutting wheels for my Dremel to get the rear fender and rack off. Everything on it still is soaking in penetrant. A few minor frame repairs will be needed with some welding gear, but I'll figure that out later.

I attempted to save the rear hub but in disassembling it, that poor Sturmey's internals just crumbled. The brake arm was suprisingly still good, as was the cog. The brightest side to the salvageability of the whole thing though was the fact that the bb/crankset spun right of and the chrome has only surface rust on it. I really dig that chainring...
 
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100% agree the main frame is built on the CWC/Roadmaster tooling bought by AMF in 1950. First time I've seen one with that sprocket or a solid blade fork.