1951 CWC Roadmaster

Starnger

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Managed to purchase some 1/2" block pedals locally! It is a modern production, but seems pretty close to what original block pedals used to look like. Paid just 5 bucks for a set, getting ones from US would cost me about 80 :)
Now i am looking for some Persons blocks, to get closer to original looks. Though those brown blocks look great too!
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Starnger

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I also have original rubber blocks from my K-Rat build, I won't need them :wink1: They are 88x22x22mm
Cool! I'd be happy to get them from you :) Next time i am in Warsaw i make sure to get in touch with you :)

In the mean time i got a special delivery from across the ocean today!
IMG_4803.jpg

It is in a pretty good condition actually, just a bit of surface rust, inside the paint is almost great, apart maybe from a couple of scratches and rusty spots.
Still did not find any more CWC owners in Europe, apart from a guy who sent me the saddle and the Delta light from UK. He owns 24 inch 1952 CWC bike. I guess it is a matter of going to some shows now, since probably not everyone is in internet :)
 
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Got some parts delivered!
First a cool Persons saddle. It would need some cleanup, but condition is good! It is the first time i am having one in my hands, old American saddles are not quite popular here, but i love the way it is designed! How service friendly it is on a contrary to modern saddles built to be thrown away after a while.
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Then another saddle, maker unknown. This one is more beaten up, but has original 5/8 clamp and springs here feel softer then ones on Persons. I don't yet know what am i going to do with them, but cleanup comes first for sure.
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And here is original Delta light! Very cool one! And still works! Would use cleanup and new paint job to refresh the chipping away chrome.
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I have dismantled several old American saddles and after removing the paint I applied Ospho, which contains phosphoric acid. I then put on primer and then dipped the springs in a can of black paint and let it drain and dry for several weeks. After painting I applied boiled linseed oil and let that dry. To recover the saddle I made a mold using an old plastic box and filled that with wall board plaster and pressed in the saddle with the original padded covering. Fill in any old original wrinkles that appear in the mold after it dries. I use an old closed cell exercise mat for replacement padding (some people use old carpet padding). I glue this on with contact cement. I use sand paper to contour the closed cell mat. I then cover the exercise mat with a thin layer of open cell foam padding, it's usually black and sometimes electronics are wrapped in it. I glue this on top of the mat with contact cement. I start at the nose of the saddle and cover it with whatever I'm using and use contact cement to complete cover the mat. I place it in the mold with the vinyl glued on with contact cement and clamp it in place. After it dries and you remove it you will have to loosen the spots where the wrinkles are and adjust and re glue several times. You may have to cut some relief areas under the seat to pull out some wrinkles. Once it's good bolt on the bottom pan. The thin layer of open cell foam is important as it makes it easier to fit the top vinyl cover. I have tried stretch vinyl and it is no easier to put on wrinkle free than normal vinyl and costs a lot more. I use water proof marine vinyl.
 

Starnger

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I have dismantled several old American saddles and after removing the paint I applied Ospho, which contains phosphoric acid. I then put on primer and then dipped the springs in a can of black paint and let it drain and dry for several weeks. After painting I applied boiled linseed oil and let that dry. To recover the saddle I made a mold using an old plastic box and filled that with wall board plaster and pressed in the saddle with the original padded covering. Fill in any old original wrinkles that appear in the mold after it dries. I use an old closed cell exercise mat for replacement padding (some people use old carpet padding). I glue this on with contact cement. I use sand paper to contour the closed cell mat. I then cover the exercise mat with a thin layer of open cell foam padding, it's usually black and sometimes electronics are wrapped in it. I glue this on top of the mat with contact cement. I start at the nose of the saddle and cover it with whatever I'm using and use contact cement to complete cover the mat. I place it in the mold with the vinyl glued on with contact cement and clamp it in place. After it dries and you remove it you will have to loosen the spots where the wrinkles are and adjust and re glue several times. You may have to cut some relief areas under the seat to pull out some wrinkles. Once it's good bolt on the bottom pan. The thin layer of open cell foam is important as it makes it easier to fit the top vinyl cover. I have tried stretch vinyl and it is no easier to put on wrinkle free than normal vinyl and costs a lot more. I use water proof marine vinyl.
Thank you for the thorough guide! I did re-wrap two Electra saddles before, and surely there is a long way to go for me to master that skill!
 
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Starnger

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I am now realizing i am posting here almost every day! I guess i am quite passionate about that build :) It is quite active, so here are the updates:

I got the head badge delivered today! So nice of the seller, he even included original screws!


Yesterday i have shortened the Schwinn fork to fit my frame. I really just removed a little bit, less than an inch of a tube.


And of course got rid of those ugly v-brake bosses :)


Then i got back to the garage and kept thinking of where to get a seat post for it. Not possible to find imperial standard tubing here, 5/8" is 15.8mm. 15 is too small and 16 is too big to fit here, i tried both. My plan is to ask a local blacksmith with a good lathe to turn 16mm stainless rod down to 15.8mm for me, so i can bend it and use for my bike. But that would take some time, and i wanted to find at least some temporary solution...
And then this got into my eyes.


Those cheap cranks measure exactly 15.8mm! And the threaded part is exactly 22, like modern seat clamps. I had a set of new 152mm cranks, that got delivered to me by a mistake. They were too short for me anyway (and i have more if i need), but made such a great DIY lucky 7 post! That's the spirit of Rat Rod Bikes :D


Next move was turning an old American stem from 1" to 1-1/8". I had it lying around waiting for a proper project to be put on. Got a piece of an old destroyed 1-1/8" stem and a wider cone nut and here we go!


I also made a longer holes in the truss rods, since with the shorter fork they also needed shortening. And threw the bike together since i couldn't wait to see it standing! Even like that it looks so awesome! Pure CWC magic.


In the conclusion, i don't really like the way truss rods sit so low now, and i think i made a fork a bit too short, the top nut has some unused threads now. I had to better get it to LBS and thread it further, then shorten, but how would i know without trying. I am now just very glad i did extended the truss rods slots instead of permanently shortening them. I think i'd extend the fork back and thread it, then throw few spacers under it to make truss rods sit higher, leaving more space for the logo. Or should i maybe just make my own truss rods instead?
 

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Starnger

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Hello everyone. Here are some updates on the bike!

Last week i have test-fitted the tank. Looks great!
IMG_4877.JPG


Then i have repaired an old Sachs Duomatic hub. I want this bike to be functional, so decided to sacrifice a little on originality and put a slightly later but geared hub. Since i want to keep the cool looks of the bike without any cables, my choice was a kickback hub. Getting the bendix from US is too expensive, so i have chosen a local alternative.
IMG_4878.JPG


It was made from 1964 till 1970 and has 1:1 and 1:1.36 steps.
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I was not really planning to use a rack on my bike, and i still don't know if i would, but i then i got this sweetest deal for one.
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I don't know what bike it comes from, but seems period correct. Got it for 10$. Can anyone recognize the maker? @SpikeFC, may it be spółdzielnia "Solidarność"?
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Anyway, it fits the bike well, so i would see if i want to use it or not after i get the bike painted.
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Great choice for a hub! You can actually find out the exact production year from the letter coding on the brake lever.

I don't know what bike it comes from, but seems period correct. Got it for 10$. Can anyone recognize the maker? @SpikeFC, may it be spółdzielnia "Solidarność"?
View attachment 113925[/ATTACH]
Well You are actually right ;) It's a ZZR-made rack used in ZZR Korlis bicycles in the sixties. The one you bought (10$ is a very good price for a Korlis rack, since they normally go for more like 30$-50$) has probably a custom made mounting supports, since I didn't see anything like that in any of the Korlis bicycles.



The funny thing is that I'm finishing a restoration of a girls Korlis for a friend.


I can measure the rack tommorow at work so you will have a comparsion.

Also that collection of forks in the back - super cool :eek: Wish I had forks like those for my projects :21:
 

Starnger

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Great choice for a hub! You can actually find out the exact production year from the letter coding on the brake lever.



Well You are actually right ;) It's a ZZR-made rack used in ZZR Korlis bicycles in the sixties. The one you bought (10$ is a very good price for a Korlis rack, since they normally go for more like 30$-50$) has probably a custom made mounting supports, since I didn't see anything like that in any of the Korlis bicycles.



The funny thing is that I'm finishing a restoration of a girls Korlis for a friend.


I can measure the rack tommorow at work so you will have a comparsion.

Also that collection of forks in the back - super cool :eek: Wish I had forks like those for my projects :21:
Thanks a lot! I was thinking of Korlis, but this support mount got me confused, it looks to be really good quality, so if it is custom, someone knew his craft well.
Nice restoration project! Are you planning to put white walls on?
Talking of forks, the only one of them that is really hard to get is this Phat XC-3 fork. Those 3g/Phat forks get quite rare lately, and i really dig the double top crown instead of the stem design, so i made myself a little stash of them for future projects :) This one is best condition and biggest size of them all. The rest of what you can see on the pic can be easily bought for money, so tell me if i can help you finding one :) And i will keep your offer about the lamp in mind :)
 
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Thanks a lot! I was thinking of Korlis, but this support mount got me confused, it looks to be really good quality, so if it is custom, someone knew his craft well.
Indeed it's a very fine piece of craftsmanship.

Nice restoration project! Are you planning to put white walls on?
You already guessed it! All spokes new, and brand new whitewalls from Kenda in the same size as the original ones (26x 1 3/8, 590 size)


All of the bike is in 9/10 shape.

I talked with a few guys that are hardcore into Polish bicycles, and they send me this... still don't know what to think of it...



And this:

And as a fun fact - this. Probably the only one remaining in Poland.

(the tank is actually factory made, but it wasn't even in the brochures)