Weird 3d printed fixie.

Discussion in 'BIKE TALK' started by Grant, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    I make parts for 3D industrial printers that run $1+ million...and they don't have the footprint to print up a bike frame...not even close (well, maybe a frame for 12" wheels :grin:).
     
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  2. SpikeFC

    SpikeFC

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    Well actually the thing with alternative drivetrain to a chain+sprockets is almost as old as the bicycle itself... and at the end of the day we still ride chain powered bicycles.

    The same goes with materials used for the frame. Wood, Carbon, Plastic etc. and still the most popular is Alloy & Steel.
     
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  3. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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    Steel is real! Nothing feels like it. I don't enjoy the harsh feel of aluminum, I don't think carbon is durable enough, I don't trust iits longevity, and if you chip it, it's toast!
    I haven't tried titanium, but if anyone has a large ti frame, maybe 97 Kona King Kahuna, I'd be glad to take it for some long term testing...
    Until then, make mine cro-mo!
     
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  4. Starnger

    Starnger

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    Steel feels soft and springy indeed, and i do enjoy my steel Basman over aluminium one for chilled out rides. Great opportunity to compare materials directly, since the geometry is same and components used in builds are similar as well, steel forks are way softer then aluminium ones too. But for many purposes when weight matters, like when you travel, or need to take a bike to the train, or want to get somewhere really fast, aluminium is a good choice.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
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  5. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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    Yeah, my BMX is aluminum, it also has advantage when trying to put down some speed, quickly! The stiff chassis transmits the power to the ground immediately! My "road bike" is chromo, and has a low travel oil shock for even more cush. My cruiser is Chinese steel, flexy like a boiled noodle!
     
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  6. Duchess

    Duchess

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    Cromoly is my favorite for its ride and weight for its price. I also would love to try titanium, but never had the opportunity. One of the things I love about bikes is their environmental friendliness, so I have no interest in CF as I don't trust its longevity and I don't like that it can't be recycled. I'm also not sure about repairability. There are ways to fix it, but with the frame being engineered in a specific way for load bearing, I have my doubts about the efficacy of patches. I think most people like the feel of a light weight bike, but it's very low priority for me as I don't race and usually carry stuff. With appropriate geometry and gearing, the additional weight is unnoticeable while riding (until you have to pick it up). Besides, I'm about 170 lbs., so the difference in overall weight between me and 35 lbs of cheap, durable, comfortable, and versatile bike (with lights, full fenders, and rack) vs expensive with limited use and lifespan 18 lbs stripper doesn't seem worth it for me for about a 9% difference.
     
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  7. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    I have mild, hi-ten, chromoly, and aluminum frames, and, quite honestly I can't feel this harshness or spongy-ness that people talk about. I feel weight...but not 'flex'.

    Might be a princess and the pea thing...and I ain't no princess :grin:.
     
  8. Starnger

    Starnger

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    May also depend on the frame geometry. Not so big of a difference on a normal cruiser, but on a long stretch cruiser there is more :)
     
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  9. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    Solid point...but, I have a lot of bmx bikes as well...and there is no end to comments on such and such frame is harsh, or spindly, or whatever. I have no experience racing off a gate, so that may be where all this flex is felt. Lots of comments on mountain bikes as well, don't feel it there either. Hoping to start getting some track time this summer, so maybe I'll begin to notice this mystical sponginess once I get some gate starts under my belt :bigsmile:.
     
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  10. SpikeFC

    SpikeFC

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    As most of you guys say - best choice for me is Cro-Mo. My girlfriend has a very old (and also expensive at the time!) trekking bike that when new was all-round on a Shimano Alivio group. It's really nice & stiff, and also very fast, even with it's original casette & crankset. Sadly most a lot of parts had to be changed to new ones, from a lot of wear, but I'm still keeping it in the Alivio groupset or higher.
     
  11. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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    I feel the stiffness of aluminum in my palms...more of the ground transferred to my hands. A chromoly frame flexes, acting as a spring. The wheelbase probably amplifies it, I'm comparing an aluminum 24" BMX to a chromo 26" MTB and a cheap steel cruiser

    *There is also a slim possibility that I have no idea what I'm talking about...
     
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  12. Grant

    Grant

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    I use steel because it has no fatigue limit. A 225 pound man could ride a steel bike over 100 years and it would still be like new. If a 125 pound man were to ride aluminum for 20 years, it would break. Carbon would break if it was to be ridden by a 100 pound man for 20 years.

    STEEL IS REAL!
    bjhk.jpg
     
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  13. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    Your basic premise was considered true up until the last couple decades. It has now been determined that all metallic materials will eventually fail due to fatigue from even very small loads, far below the fatigue limit, with enough cycles. This didn't take scientists to figure out, plenty of car guys have noted this in suspension components of cars with no rust issues or impact evidence...control arms, especially, sag/twist/deform after several decades of normal driving.
     
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