Vintage Phillips

Oct 23, 2020
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Vicars, travelling midwifes and nurses loved these things. They were very much a utilitarian bicycle. Love the patina! Waterslide decals, as well. Looks to be 50s-60s vintage.

Nice steed you have there.
 
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Jun 14, 2014
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Vicars, travelling midwifes and nurses loved these things. They were very much a utilitarian bicycles. Love the patina! Waterslide decals, as well. Looks to be 50s-60s vintage.

Nice steed you have there.
I was convinced it´s older than that.
On the other hand, U.K has always been very conservative, so maybe...
 
Oct 23, 2020
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Is there any good reason to keep it original or can I modify it with a clear consciense?
I mean, I don´t want to waste a relic...
I’d keep it original, if it were me. The bar actuated brakes are reason enough.

There were many in circulation. I would need to ring some of my older mechanic friends back in Bristol and see what they know. Pre 70s English bicycles are always a treat.
 
Jun 14, 2014
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I’d keep it original, if it were me. The bar actuated brakes are reason enough.

There were many in circulation. I would need to ring some of my older mechanic friends back in Bristol and see what they know. Pre 70s English bicycles are always a treat.
I like those brakes / brake handles too, they are rare here.

Let me know if and when you have more info.
Thanks in advance.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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The wiki article cites the mopeds more than anything. In 1980, they were absorbed by Raleigh and the name is still licensed in India. The model you have is likely a very high production model; of course it was very popular with utilitarian purposes. I still stand by my assertion that it is likely 50s or early 60s. I don’t know that England had the restrictions on metal that America did during the Second World War; however- they had rationing of resources that lasted a few years past the Second World War. I am lead to believe the reflector bracket in the front puts it later. I will ring my old pals in the week.
 
Jan 21, 2009
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It's pre 1960 at least. That's when Raleigh bought out all the different brands like Hercules and BSA for bikes and made them all in Nottingham. Yours is a Phillips of the original maker. The lugs on the frame seem older than the 50's to me but I'm not an expert. They used Sturmey Archer hubs on many of these English bikes. The hubs have a 2 digit date stamp on the shell, but your rear hub looks different, it may not show the date on it. Even though the rear wheel is in backwards, the rims match, so it probably is the wheel that came with it.
Pics of 50's Phillips bikes may show the same bike, giving you an idea of what year. I'm guessing late 40's to early 50's.
I would keep it original, and I have found the finish on the older English bikes, paint and chrome, to be good quality that will shine nicely with car wax and chrome polish. The black may come back glossy. I would be careful on the decals though.
 
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It probably originally had an enclosed chain guard. I have a similar bike but the guard totally encloses the chain, good to keep your pants clean but almost impossible to put on a new tire. The chain easily falls off the chainring when changing a tire and I had to remove the crank arm to get the chain back on. The guard is even harder to get off and press the sections back together. My guess your guard was removed so it could more easily worked on it.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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It probably originally had an enclosed chain guard. I have a similar bike but the guard totally encloses the chain, good to keep your pants clean but almost impossible to put on a new tire. The chain easily falls off the chainring when changing a tire and I had to remove the crank arm to get the chain back on. The guard is even harder to get off and press the sections back together. My guess your guard was removed so it could more easily worked on it.
That’s what is missing! The chain guards are a very unique feature on these, as designed to keep your trousers or hosiery clean. I vaguely remember these bikes as a lad.

There is a TV show called Father Brown or something like that set in the 50s. I do believe the Vicar rides something very similar as do the Midwives on “Call the Midwife”, both great period post-war TV shows. That’s kinda what brought my interest back to these machines.
 
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That’s what is missing! The chain guards are a very unique feature on these, as designed to keep your trousers or hosiery clean. I vaguely remember these bikes as a lad.

There is a TV show called Father Brown or something like that set in the 50s. I do believe the Vicar rides something very similar as do the Midwives on “Call the Midwife”, both great period post-war TV shows. That’s kinda what brought my interest back to these machines.
Father Brown’s calls his bicycle Bucephalus, after Alexander the Great’s horse. The horse was black and so is Father Brown‘s bicycle. Father Brown also has skirt guards on Bucephalus so that his vestments don’t get entangled in his rear wheel. His bicycle is basically the same as yours. I would keep it original. The wheel rims are unique and only rod brakes work on them. I would put vintage grips and a wheel generator and lights on it. I would also look for a chain guard and perhaps a rear wheel drop stand for it. A Simple Green quick spray and water wash will do wonders. Then a light coat of boiled linseed oil to keep off more rust. That’s a real nice bike.
 
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Oct 23, 2020
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Father Brown’s calls his bicycle Bucephalus, after Alexander the Great’s horse. The horse was black and so is Father Brown‘s bicycle. Father Brown also has skirt guards on Bucephalus so that his vestments don’t get entangled in his rear wheel. His bicycle is basically the same as yours. I would keep it original. The wheel rims are unique and only rod brakes work on them. I would put vintage grips and a wheel generator and lights on it. I would also look for a chain guard and perhaps a rear wheel drop stand for it. A Simple Green quick spray and water wash will do wonders. Then a light coat of boiled linseed oil to keep off more rust. That’s a real nice bike.
I suspected it was similar. I remember seeing a LOT of these back in Bristol growing up! Of course my friends and I were way too cool for the square Raleighs and similar and got our grubby little paws onto the few Mongoose bikes that were imported LOL Of course Raleigh had their own BMX, but the American stuff was cooler! Seeing one of these brings back part of my youth. I have been in the US since ‘87 to play hockey.

I agree: keep it original!
 
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I suspected it was similar. I remember seeing a LOT of these back in Bristol growing up! Of course my friends and I were way too cool for the square Raleighs and similar and got our grubby little paws onto the few Mongoose bikes that were imported LOL Of course Raleigh had their own BMX, but the American stuff was cooler! Seeing one of these brings back part of my youth. I have been in the US since ‘87 to play hockey.

I agree: keep it original!
That old English black paint is incredible stuff. Paint remover won’t touch it, power brushing hardly scratches it. It’s the toughest frame paint I have ever tried to remove. Best not to try.
 
Jun 14, 2014
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Tampere, Finland
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Thank you all for your info an input.
I would like to keep it original but seems it´s very hard to find parts for it here in Finland.
If you can help me on that, it would be great.
For now I need at least the missing parts for the front brake.
 
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Thank you all for your info an input.
I would like to keep it original but seems it´s very hard to find parts for it here in Finland.
If you can help me on that, it would be great.
For now I need at least the missing parts for the front front tire.
The nickel is in good shape. There is a headlight mount so it probably had a generator, like mine does. Look on the front and rear triangle to see if the paint has an area where it was mounted. Keep looking on eBay, you’ll eventually find the parts. In the meantime clean and ride.
 
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Jan 21, 2009
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I would take it completely apart, takings pics to be sure how it goes back together, clean, shine, and then lube all the bearings. The bearings are loose, so have a container ready to catch them. Count them all. Then each part can individually worked on to get it in the best condition. Everything can be adjusted perfectly. When it's back together you'll be amazed how good it looks.

What did the front wheel need?
 
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I would take it completely apart, takings pics to be sure how it goes back together, clean, shine, and then lube all the bearings. The bearings are loose, so have a container ready to catch them. Count them all. Then each part can individually worked on to get it in the best condition. Everything can be adjusted perfectly. When it's back together you'll be amazed how good it looks.

What did the front wheel need?
Looks like the front rod brake is missing? The lever is there but?
 
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I think it looks better without the chain guard. As others have said, service it and ride it. Shouldn't be difficult to find parts for if needed.
 
Jun 14, 2014
154
181
Tampere, Finland
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I would take it completely apart, takings pics to be sure how it goes back together, clean, shine, and then lube all the bearings. The bearings are loose, so have a container ready to catch them. Count them all. Then each part can individually worked on to get it in the best condition. Everything can be adjusted perfectly. When it's back together you'll be amazed how good it looks.

What did the front wheel need?
Sorry, misspell. Need the parts for front brake...
 
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