Ride-ability?

Discussion in 'MBBO & WBO 2019 DISCUSSION' started by GuitarlCarl, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. GuitarlCarl

    GuitarlCarl

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    In the past and I'm guessing at some point again, ride ability has or/is been/being questioned. Usually in conjunction with a lowrider style build with cranks that obviously can't be pedaled. But can it be ridden? You could probably sit on it and "stride" your way down the road. Is that a ride? Personal tastes aside, I wonder why we can't put a definition on rideable, or if it's been done and I missed it...

    Carl.
     
  2. toro1978

    toro1978

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    I would assume it has to be pedaled. Otherwise one could eliminate the drivetrain completely and leave the BB 1mm above the ground. Hypothetically.
     
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  3. handyandy1100

    handyandy1100

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    I guess "rideability" is kind of open to interpretation. I think it starts with stuff like will 7" cranks work on a bike with 6" of ground clearance at the BB, but I tend to add in stuff like, do the brakes work or if there is too much rust to safely support a rider. At least as far as my builds are concerned that's what I think of for rideability. I don't think an "official" definition of the word needs to go that far though.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
     
  4. CRASH

    CRASH

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    I would say you'd have to be able to make a full rotation of the pedals. "Striding" isn't riding a bicycle. I mean, show bikes are just that. But in the spirit of the rule, I would say a bike would have to have enough clearance to make a full rotation. But that's just my opinion. @LukeTheJoker makes and enforces the rules.
     
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  5. GuitarlCarl

    GuitarlCarl

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    That's where I'm at too. Seems to me like a bicycle should be pedaled. But I'm also just a participant. Mostly just wondering about a definition to stifle any controversy later. Not looking to call anyone out.

    Carl.
     
  6. SpikeFC

    SpikeFC

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    While lowriders are super cool, and I love them, I'm personally leaning towards what @CRASH wrote. If you can't pedal, but stride instead, then you can probably just build a scooter.

    Fun fact. The kinda same question rose a few years back in the polish parliament, since the law stated that "anything that is moved by muscle power is considered a bike", that meant roller blades, skateboards, push carts, scooters etc. They solved it by changing the frase to "...moved by muscle power through a drivetrain..."

    Yet again this year another problem came with the popularisation of electric scooters. After the bike law changed scooters were now treated as pedestrians, and allowed only to move on sidewalks. But it's highly dangerous for pedestrians who move at an average speed of 5km/h to allow an e-scooter to move among them, when it can reach a top speed above 25km/h
     
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  7. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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    From Merriam Webster:
    "Bike:
    a vehicle with two wheels tandem, handlebars for steering, a saddle seat, and pedals by which it is propelled"
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
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  8. HuffnPuff

    HuffnPuff

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    Surely rideability must be assessed over a 1km undulating course with minimum elevation gain of 30m including 2 each of left and right corners of an angle greater than 45degrees and maximum raduis of 5m, and including one 3 second stop between 300m And 700m, with an adult rider of minimum height 160cm with a weight no less than 70kg using the pedals as the only means of propulsion.

    Or maybe just ‘can you ride it?’
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
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  9. GuitarlCarl

    GuitarlCarl

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    There's no need for extremes. But I can build and ride a scooter and it ain't a bike. So maybe like I pondered at the beginning, what is the definition of ride-ability? As stated in the rules there is no definition. No useable drivetrain would simplify my build for sure but could I take it to the city and ride with the Taildraggers? No, I might as well have a flat.

    Carl.

    Sent from the edge of an alternate universe...
     
  10. GuitarlCarl

    GuitarlCarl

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    I did think of a great name for a strider tho...

    Yabba-dabba-do
    Merle.
     
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  11. HuffnPuff

    HuffnPuff

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    Tongue firmly planted in cheek there. I was just pondering what tests would be required to prove ride ability, pedalling, turning both ways stopping and starting, up and down with a ‘reasonable load’ then chucked that into lawyer or engineering spec format. :D
     
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  12. OddJob

    OddJob

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    The rules established by the site creator and main king pin, @Rat Rod (Steve), say this:
    "Bike must be rideable and pedal powered."

    However, in the WBO / Class 2 portion of our current build off, "scooters" are listed as an option for a 21" wheel or smaller build. And my experience with scooters is that they are not pedaled.

    So for this build off, I'm not sure what constitutes 'ride-ability'.
     
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  13. GuitarlCarl

    GuitarlCarl

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    Well there ya go. Class two can have scooters so I suppose that a "strider" should be fine. Slide yer tail around on the ground like Cheech in a strait jacket, we'll see if that flys...

    Merle. :crazy:
     
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  14. SwissGuy

    SwissGuy

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    Ride-ability is relative....
    Ride-able by the builder yes, by anyone no!

    (I so much need to have one of these!!!!)
     
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  15. SpikeFC

    SpikeFC

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    Now that is wacky!
     
  16. Psychographic

    Psychographic

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  17. ParkRNDL

    ParkRNDL

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    ok, this is FASCINATING. Going to show this to my wife; she teaches Spanish and Italian and has told me about the "learning a language at a young age" thing before.

    I wonder if, when he "clicked" back to being able to ride a conventional bike again, he couldn't ride the reverse steer one anymore. Like I wonder if it's possible to maintain the skills to do both.
     
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  18. LukeTheJoker

    LukeTheJoker Moderator

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    Lets go with: "If it has cranks and pedals, they should work to propel the build"

    But yes, we are encouraging scooters, so they do not need to have pedals!
     
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  19. OddJob

    OddJob

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    Here's something that's weird though. I have a tiller operated steering mechanism on my pontoon. It requires me to push the handle on the tiller in the opposite way I want the boat to turn. I rarely mess up on this, usually only momentarily when I have the pontoon in reverse.

    I can drive the pontoon up to the boat landing, load it on the trailer, and then immediately get in my vehicle and pull the boat out of the water and turn the steering wheel and park the trailer, while backing up, with no problem.

    Why is that? It might be muscle memory for the two separate operations, but my brain still has to remember which is which. I don't get why it can't be done on the bicycle.
     
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  20. handyandy1100

    handyandy1100

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    Maybe it's the balance factor? You don't need to maintain balance driving a car or running a boat. Probably like learning to walk all over again switching from a crazy bike back to a "normal" one.

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