info on internal hubs and shifters

Discussion in 'HOW TO' started by kidgambit, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    im wanting to install a 117 mm internal hub on my schwinn stingray. but idk what brand to get. some insight would help
  2. B607

    B607 Pro Member

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,962
    Location:
    Findlay, IL
    Get a blue band Bendix kickback 2-speed. That's one of the internal hubs came on StingRays. Gary
  3. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    How many speeds do you want?
  4. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    3 because in building a suicide shifter
  5. gcrank1

    gcrank1

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    North of Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Im sure I remember reading that the Japanese version of the Sturmey Archer 3spd is better than the original. I only have the Brit versions, though. There is some talk they can slip in high which, if you are standing over a high toptube on an accent can be.......'octave raising'. See 'Sheldon Browns' website.
  6. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    it has to be a 3 speed and have a twist grip shifter
  7. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    I'll just throw this out there - it might be worth considering.

    Sturmey Archer's 8-speed internal gear hub is fairly inexpensive and lends itself well to 20" wheel bikes. I have the idea that they intended it for folders, like Dahon. Where most internal hubs use 1:1 ratio in the middle, S-A's 8-speed has 1:1 in first gear, and all ratios go up from there. So, with the typical Schwinn 46T chainring, you would have a speed range comparable to a typical road bike, but on a Stingray. So far, it only comes with a twist grip shifter, so you'd still be in luck there. The no-brake version (if you use rim brakes) can have an OLD down to 120 mm, IIRC, but the drum brake version is out at 135 mm, requiring respacing. Any way you look at it, it would be trick, and you could probably embarass the occasional roadie by keeping up with him...

    I have the idea that this is what I'm going to use on my '69 Fastback, especially since the original 3-speed hub is busted and the shifter is missing...
  8. hubgearfreak

    hubgearfreak

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    271
    Location:
    lincoln, england
    it''d certainly be painful. it happens through neglect & stupidity regarding cable adjustment, not an inherently poor design.
    most, if not all, new SA 3 speed hubs are NIG anyway, which compensates for slapdash maintainance
  9. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    so your saying the s a 8 speed internal hub and twist grip shifter is the way to go. do u know the price and where to get one
  10. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    IIRC, you can find them on Amazon. $140 for the regular version, $160 for the drum brake.
  11. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    can u post a link
  12. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Sure, but going to Amazon and looking in the hub section of the bicycle parts section isn't tough...

    http://tinyurl.com/7w7hr6c

    Anyway, the listing says that the hub is 135 mm OLD. But see the stack of lock nuts on the non-drive side? S-A says that you can narrow the spacing by removing the redundant nuts. At least you can for the no-brake version; you can get it down to 120 mm.
  13. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    i need for sure answers. i am new to this stuff
  14. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
  15. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    which one comes with everything i need
  16. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Any of them come complete with shifter, cable, installation hardware, etc. The information is all right there. Just choose whether you want the one with the drum brake, or if you want the brakeless version (are you using a rim brake?). I'm assuming that you don't want the one with the disc brake mount. This link is to a brakeless one already set up for the narrower OLD: http://tinyurl.com/7unpz5w
  17. kidgambit

    kidgambit

    0   0   0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    138
    i have never installed one before. any instruction or videos on how to install one
  18. expjawa

    expjawa

    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,319
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Installing an internal gear hub - or any hub, for that matter - really boils down to wheelbuilding. You take a rim, the hub, and a pile of spokes and you'll have to lace it all together, true it, and tension it. A lot of folks find it intimidating, but I feel that's easily overcome with knowledge. I understand that isn't technically difficult, but can be tedious. I've not done it myself yet, so I can't advise on it in any greater depth. However, I can tell you that there are many websites and videos online that take you through the process.

    Try doing a little research - google "bicycle wheelbuilding" or something similar. Read and review the various sites you find until you find one that makes the most sense to you. Also, keep in mind that if you don't feel comfortable with doing it, you always have the option of having your local bike shop do it. Chances are, they'll appreciate the business...

Share This Page